The Sleep Rite Experience v. Hospital Sleep Labs

by / / Uncategorized

If you believe that you suffer from sleep apnea, insomnia, narcolepsy, or restless leg syndrome, a sleep study may be your first step toward getting the right treatment and getting good, consistent sleep again. However, a lot of people hesitate to take this important step.

They think that a sleep study will be expensive, uncomfortable, and inconvenient, and they’re right…if they choose to go to a hospital sleep lab over a Sleep Rite lab. Many people just don’t know that they have the choice and how much of a difference it can make.

A sleep study should mimic a normal night’s sleep, as much as possible, and that’s hard enough with a minimum of 22 contact points between the patient and the polysomnography equipment. Add to that a cold, harsh hospital environment, and you’re going to have a very different (very unpleasant) environment from your normal sleeping conditions for your sleep study.

Simulate the Comfort of Home

When you choose a Sleep Rite lab for your sleep study, you’ll experience full-service care with all the amenities you could possibly need to simulate a normal night’s sleep. When you choose the Sleep Rite experience, you’ll get:

  • A well furnished, private room
  • Your own bathroom
  • Quality bedding for a sleeping position that won’t hurt or make you toss and turn
  • Plenty of pillows and blankets
  • A flat screen TV

And those are just the room’s amenities. In addition to all that, your safety is guaranteed by 24-hour security monitoring, and a licensed and registered technician will be conducting and overseeing your study to ensure that everything goes smoothly. Your care is Sleep Rite’s top priority, so you’ll never have to worry about the staff assigned to you being called away for an emergency.

In a hospital, you can’t expect a whole lot of privacy, and your care providers may be stretched over an entire floor of patients with needs “more serious” than yours. If you’ve ever tried to sleep in a hospital before, you know that it’s not exactly an environment conducive to rest.

At a Sleep Rite lab, your technician and care providers’ sole job is to monitor your sleep study and ensure that you are comfortable and cared for. You’ll be sleeping in a comfortable room with all of the amenities, and you won’t have to worry about anyone on your study being called away.

No Risk of Infection

It’s an unpleasant fact, but it’s a reality – when you go to a hospital, you risk infection. Though everything possible is done to keep contagious patients and infectious diseases away from uninfected patients, healthcare associated infections occur at an alarming rate in the United States.

Just the knowledge of taking that risk can make you anxious and set your sleep cycle off; let alone the risk, itself. At Sleep Rite, you won’t be exposed to any of the potential infections you would in a hospital environment.

Sleep Rite Can Save You Money on a Sleep Study

In addition to being a more comfortable and secure experience with a significantly smaller risk of infection, the Sleep Rite experience is actually less expensive than going to a hospital lab. If you go to a hospital for a sleep study, you can expect to pay between $2000 and $6000. Your insurance co-pay may help with that, but the cost will usually remain in the thousands.

On the other hand, patients with insurance who come to Sleep Rite for a sleep study usually have a co-pay of less than $150. Even without insurance, a baseline study at Sleep Rite is usually only about $700, which is still a hefty discount.

So, if you want a sleep study that won’t elevate your anxiety or your risk of infection and won’t cost you thousands of dollars, go to a Sleep Rite lab near you, not the hospital. For more information, contact us today at (504) 780-2400.

 

Sources:

http://clearhealthcosts.com/blog/2013/04/how-much-does-a-sleep-study-cost-well-600-or-5070/

http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/stories/2012/january/16/sleep-studies.aspx

https://www.sleeprite.com/

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sleepapnea/printall-index.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polysomnography

TOP